Close Information
Description
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    A historical novel that brings to life a true story only remembered in outline. In the North Yemen Civil War of the 1960s, two girls whose brothers and fathers had been killed in the fighting believed enough in their cause to join the fight themselves. They dressed as men and reported for duty. This novel uses intuition, imagination, and the author's experience with modern day Yemeni women to fill out this tale of courage, loss, sorrow, and ultimately of disillusion. The author is Carolyn Han, an American woman who earlier had traveled to Asia, married, and taken the name of her Chinese husband. Later, she returned to the US and, after a divorce, sojourned in Yemen for eight years. Here she studied Arabic, got to know women in this traditional society, and traveled alone with Bedouin guides across a forbidding desert (Ramlat as-Sab’atayn). Her prose brings alive the plight of young and old caught in armed conflict. A historical anti-war novel.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    620,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    Refugees who have fled famine and violence and resettled in the US too often are isolated, disconnected, living in despair. They typically have housing, food, clothing. Yet they miss the large inter-connected families, the all-embracing social fabric, the living culture in which they were raised.

    This book tells the unknown story of ordinary Americans who saw a need, created an ingenious solution, worked hard, asked nothing in return­­—and found that their own lives were uplifted.

    Patricia Martin Holt has written a book about “fabric” . . . the fabric of lives in warm, welcoming communities as well as the complex cross-stitched fabrics that she first encountered in Jordan in 1982. When her husband was posted to Amman Jordan, Patricia met a Renaissance woman named Leila Wahbeh and followed her to the local refugee camps. Here, Patricia found women who were creating textiles with intricate designs­—and restoring themselves and their families in the process.

    Years later in the Atlanta suburbs, Patricia discovered the Peace of Thread movement, which was founded in 2003 by another Renaissance woman—Denise Smith. Here too, Patricia saw that refugee women working with fabric, selling their creations in posh stores and on Esty, were overcoming their isolation, strengthening their families, making some money, and embuing their lives with purpose.

    Patricia realized that we can work for world peace without grand gestures, photo ops, or foreign travel. All that is needed is to lend a hand to those in need who live in the same cities and counties where we live.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    This work of narrative nonfiction traces Patience Gromes, an African-American woman whose grandfather escaped from slavery, and others of her generation in the century from the Civil War to the War on Poverty.

    After the Civil War, Patience Gromes and other striving African-Americans of her generation left the country and came to the city. They married, took jobs, purchased houses, raised families. They pursued the program of hard work and thrift that their parents and grandparents had perfected in the country after the Civil War. Patience Gromes and her peers brought the project that three generations of African-Americans had been pursuing to a triumphant conclusion in the Civil Rights Movement.

     

    Then came a complex new world that rewarded a person's ability to wheel and deal in the city world, a world that rewarded bootleggers and gamblers and those who knew how to maneuver in a realm dominated by whites. Those who merely knew how to work, save, rear their children, build churches, schools, social clubs - those who merely knew how to lead good lives found themselves cut adrift. In this new modern world, Patience Gromes could scarcely survive.

    "Without seeming to try, The World of Patience Gromes contributes as much to our understanding of the modern black inner-city a any book written in this decade."
                - The Wall Street Journal

    "Scott C. Davis is a gifted writer."
                - Horton Foote

    *** Winner of the Washington State Governor's Award.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    Talented new American writers present true stories about love, work, and life. Guest essays by the late Horton Foote, Vaclav Havel, and Arun Gandhi.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    297,475
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    Work in progress - not yet for sale.

    40-somethings filmmaker David Lang and cabaret singer Holly Markham seem to have finally reached the end of their turbulent relationship and are about to part ways forever when Holly discovers that she's pregnant.  She's pretty sure that David is not great daddy material, but she may never have another chance to be a mom.  And David?  He's distracted by the otherworldly being he thinks he sees on their bed.

    Work in progress - not yet for sale.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    Twenty-five paintings by Helen Zughraib accompanied by text based on favorite stories told by her father about life in Syria and Lebanon in the 1930s and during World War II.

    Helen's father was born in the Old Quarter of Damascus during Ottoman times when Le Grande Syrie included the lands that are now demarked as Syria and Lebanon. His father and mother were from the villages of Zahle and Durer Shweir in the Lebanese mountains, first cousins in an arranged marriage.

    "Let me tell you a story," Helen Zughaib's father used to say. What followed were absorbing tales of her father's childhood in Damascus, village life in Lebanon in the late 1930s, amusing relatives, happenings in their local Greek Orthodox Church, and major events in her father's young life that lead him to emigrate to the United States in 1946.

    Helen Zughaib is an award-winning artist who has developed a distinctive technique working in gouache and ink. She was born in Beirut, educated in the Middle East, Paris, and the US. She is currently based in Washington.

    Zughaib uses folkloric elements and a wide variety of other visual references to express the life and outlook of her family, the village community of her father's young adult life, and her position as an international woman with special insight and empathy for the Middle East and its people.

    Critics note the parallels between Zughaib's work as an artist with Arab roots to the art of contemporary "Native, Latin, and African American communities." (Maymanah Farhat)

    For More:

    Cultural Understanding in the Art of Helen Zughaib (by Maymanah Farhat) 
    www.onefineart.com/articles/helen-zughaib


    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    From Anne Hutchinson to Marcel Proust, from Franz Kafka to Camille Claudel, Beth Bentley's poems range the geographies of our culture.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    [Currently available in a paperback "layflat" and also in hardback bindings.]

    As a homeschooling parent, a public school teacher of reading, and a private reading tutor, Karen Louise Davidson tested the most popular methods of teaching reading. They all worked, but none of them worked well enough. Now, Karen reveals the most effective phonics method of all. Number Phonics uses numbers to identify the distinct sounds generated by different letters.

    Karen found that children were quick to grasp the logic that a single letter could represent multiple sounds. Once the logic was made clear to them, children could memorize the sounds and could easily pronounce words with number clues below the letters.

    She also found that students who had practiced using number clues were able to transition to reading normal text, without the number clues. 

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • Splash Page | Buy Now | Author

    (Volume I)
    Use Greek and Latin root words to quickly build vocabulary and to unlock the secret structure of English. Widely used for homeschooling, SAT prep, and as a language tuneup for writers and people in business.

    Widely used in homeschooling, a significant aid to SAT prep, and a growing resource for writers and people in business who want to tune up their use of language. English from the Roots Up, Volume II presents another one hundred Greek and Latin roots that are widely used in hundreds of frequently used English words. Do you want to give your children a logical grasp of word formation and language structure? Each page of English from the Roots up presents a single Greek or Latin root word along with teaching advice and with a list of English words that are built from this particular root. The author assumes that the student and teacher have no prior knowledge of Greek or Latin. Unlike other systems, English from the Roots Up does not teach a foreign language. It simply asks students to learn root words, the building blocks of larger English words. Armed with their understanding of Greek and Latin roots, students are able to decode English words. High school students find that the training in quick recognition of Greek and Latin roots improves their SAT scores and performance in class. Writers and businessmen and women use English from the Roots up to shake out the cobwebs in their thinking and speaking. Using roots words as the key to meaning, these adults find that their meanings quickly become more precise and their ability to distinguish shades of meaning improves dramatically.

    Splash Page | Buy Now | Author

     


    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • | More Info |Author | Kindle

    Alex Poppe’s characters celebrate the fragile grandeur of living an independent life in the aftermath of violence. Deeply rooted in place, these stories are about identity, hope, and redemption as fierce and flawed women rebuild their lives in the wake of war. The young women sparking through these pages are surprising, funny, and devastating: the essence of womanhood. The title piece, “Jinwar,” is a funny, yet heartbreaking story of an American woman who survived rape in the military, was denied due process, and found herself selling lunches from a truck shaped like a hot dog. In the evenings, she turned on the news to see the Kavanaugh hearings on every channel. Her struggle to rebuild her life takes her across the globe to the Middle East, to Jinwar, an all-female village in Rojava, northeastern Syria. Here, survivors of war, patriarchy, and genocide un-make violence and search for ways to heal. Timely and prescient, Jinwar is a story for the #YesAllWoman world.

    | More Info |Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    Abu al-Abbas was one of Yasser Arafat’s top generals. His name is forever linked to an operation in 1985 that sparked an international crisis: the hijacking of an Italian cruise liner named the Achille Lauro and the death of Leon Klinghoffer, an elderly American tourist. This memoir by the wife of Abu al-Abbas recalls an era of Palestinian resistance, the hard realities of a cause that faced impossible odds, and the irony that the death of a single man should outweigh all arguments of right and wrong.

    "Abu al-Abbas told his wife . . . that his intention was “to carry out an honorable operation against the Israeli Army . . . . I wanted them to reach Ashdod: not to fight the passengers on board [the Achille Lauro].”

    [Abu al-Abbas] was to be haunted by the crime for the rest of his life. And when he died mysteriously in US custody in a Baghdad prison camp after America’s 2003 invasion, all the world remembered of Al-Abbas was a crippled man called Leon Klinghoffer. No-one cared how an apparently healthy man would die in American hands."
    —Robert Fisk, The Independent

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle


    Farida Haque is a poet, artist, and writer based in Washington. Although raised in the Old City of Lahore, she held her first art exhibition in Sri Lanka. She draws inspiration from her childhood, her time in Egypt, and in her current life in the West."With poetry and art, I want to stir images, smells and sounds which seep into the subconscious, awaken them to feed the soul. Without memories, we are nothing." --Farida Haque.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    [ Available as Turning Fear into Power. Fall 2022 re-released as AFghanistan & Beyond. Text is the same in both books.]

    In the wake of the 9-11 attacks in 2001, Linda Sartor was dismayed to see her country responding primarily with military action and coercive diplomacy. Rather than isolating and defeating the perpetrators, Linda saw US action punishing the innocents in foreign lands, lending credibility to Al Qaeda's depiction of the US as an imperial state and an enemy of Islam, making enemies, and undercutting decades of effort to win the hearts and minds of people around the world.


    Linda resolved to do more than complain. For the next decade she engaged in self-styled citizen diplomacy, traveling to six war-torn countries to see for herself, and to do what she could to assist locals in their efforts to attain peace and justice.

    Linda traveled to Israel/Palestine, Iraq, Sri Lanka, Iran, Afghanistan, and Bahrain. She traveled with several different Peace and Justice organizations. And part of her story is the work of Americans and internationals to highlight injustice and to make some noise about the need for peace.

    Linda Sartor takes us behind the headlines, and she also isolates the idealism of activists from the US and other countries. She hopes that her stories will inspire readers to confront fear, to follow their hearts, and to place a bet that individual protest will, ultimately, undermine and reform the harsh imperial and economic systems that are too often accepted as a baseline "reality" when the nations of the world exercise power.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle


    A rambunctious romp which begins on the eve of the Egyptian uprising 2011, winding its way to a girls' camp in central Texas. A cadaver appears on a neighboring property. The corpse happens to have antiquities and documents from the Middle East in his garage.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle


    The story of Syria’s largest unofficial refugee camp. How it was born and how a dissident arts scene transformed the political dialogue and provided catharsis to those facing persecution and exile. This book traces the story of the camp from its beginnings, founded by Palestinians fleeing Israeli violence. The book explores Yarmouk's growth as a vibrant suburb of Damascus, home to 160,000 Palestinians and over 650,000 Syrians. 


    As cement buildings rose and bustling marketplaces expanded, Yarmouk residents continued to be restrained by dangerous political realities.  In this vulnerable space, artists, writers, playwrights, musicians, and filmmakers flourished. Some took risks and bravely spoke out through their work.  During the Syrian Civil War, they witnessed and suffered through the decimation of the mukhayyam (camp).  Art in Exile tells the story of Yarmouk through their eyes.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    602,960
    Direct Sale
  • More Info | Author | Kindle

    In recent years, there has been a strong movement in Latin America for governments to regulate working conditions of child labor. On July 2, 2014, Bolivia passed legislation to allow children to work as young as age 10. This action put Bolivia in violation of the UN Conventions regulating child labor and was strongly condemned by human rights advocacy groups. “In Child Labor – Legalize? Or Outlaw?” The author describes the child labor movement in Latin America and points out the challenge that many children have to work illegally to survive. They do not have the luxury of waiting for a “perfect” solution. Although regulations on the working conditions of child labor can protect child workers by law, it is not an effective solution on the ground. A better policy will be to protect the child workers legally while also providing a “collaborative approach.” The author explores this alternative in her book.

    More Info | Author | Kindle

    600,960
    Direct Sale
Show Thumbnails
Show Thumbnails
Exit Stack View
Women Engage the World
Women from the US and abroad, pushing forward the boundaries of human knowledge, facing the challenges of the future with clear-eyed realism, nurturing the skill and talent of their neighbors as they celebrate the contributions of citizens across the globe, upholding the highest ideals developed in the last six millenniums of human existence . . . women are leading humanity and are out best hope for survival.
Previous Image
Slide Show
Next Image
Women Engage the World
Price Information
Full Screen
Sound